Blog

| High availability and disaster recovery (HA/DR) for Postgres databases

This is a summary of Postgres Professional’s more than 6 years field experience of providing HA/DR solutions to our customers and it covers both PostgreSQL and Postgres Pro databases.

While most of our customers are making progress on their journeys to the cloud, many of the HA/DR solutions they use from the on-premises world can be used in the cloud as well.

| А deep dive into PostgreSQL query optimizations

During PostgreSQL maintenance, resource-consuming queries occur inevitably. Therefore, it's vital for every Database Engineer, DBA, or Software Developer to detect and fix them as soon as possible. In this article, we'll list various extensions and monitoring tools used to collect information about queries and display them in a human-readable way.

Then we will cover typical query writing mistakes and explain how to correct them. We will also consider cases where extended statistics are used for more accurate row count estimates. Finally, you will see an example of how PostgreSQL planner excludes redundant filter clauses during its work.

| Optimizing PostgreSQL queries: questions and answers

During our webinar on PostgreSQL query optimization, we found many of your questions interesting and helpful to the public, if properly answered. Get more useful links and working expert advice from Peter Petrov, our Database Engineer.

| Locks in PostgreSQL: 4. Locks in memory

To remind you, we've already talked about relation-level locks, row-level locks, locks on other objects (including predicate locks) and interrelationships of different types of locks.

The following discussion of locks in RAM finishes this series of articles. We will consider spinlocks, lightweight locks and buffer pins, as well as events monitoring tools and sampling.

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| Locks in PostgreSQL: 3. Other locks

We've already discussed some object-level locks (specifically, relation-level locks), as well as row-level locks with their connection to object-level locks and also explored wait queues, which are not always fair.

We have a hodgepodge this time. We'll start with deadlocks (actually, I planned to discuss them last time, but that article was excessively long in itself), then briefly review object-level locks left and finally discuss predicate locks.

| Locks in PostgreSQL: 2. Row-level locks

Last time, we discussed object-level locks and in particular relation-level locks. In this article, we will see how row-level locks are organized in PostgreSQL and how they are used together with object-level locks. We will also talk of wait queues and of those who jumps the queue.

| Locks in PostgreSQL: 1. Relation-level locks

The previous two series of articles covered isolation and multiversion concurrency control and logging.

In this series, we will discuss locks.

This series will consist of four articles:

  1. Relation-level locks (this article).
  2. Row-level locks.
  3. Locks on other objects and predicate locks.
  4. Locks in RAM.

 

| Postgres Professional adds enterprise-features, PostgreSQL 13 updates

Postgres Professional, provider of a database based on a fork of the open source Postgres relational database, today updated its offering to add support for storage-level compression and 64-bit transaction identifiers, along with all the other capabilities made available via the latest release of the core Postgres database itself.

| PostgreSQL performance issue investigation with pg_profile

In this blog post, we're explaining to those new to pg_profile why you might need this PostgreSQL extension in your daily work, on a real-world example.

| PostgreSQL benefits and challenges: A snapshot

PostgreSQL continues to improve in ways that meet the needs of even the most complex, mission-critical use cases. It also presents certain challenges.

| WAL in PostgreSQL: 4. Setup and Tuning

So, we got acquainted with the structure of the buffer cache and in this context concluded that if all the RAM contents got lost due to failure, the write-ahead log (WAL) was required to recover. The size of the necessary WAL files and the recovery time are limited thanks to the checkpoint performed from time to time.

In the previous articles we already reviewed quite a few important settings that anyway relate to WAL. In this article (being the last in this series) we will discuss problems of WAL setup that are unaddressed yet: WAL levels and their purpose, as well as the reliability and performance of write-ahead logging.

| Open Source Software Trends for 2021 and Beyond

In 2020, very few open source software projects remained truly “open” without a single company acting essentially as an owner. PostgreSQL and Debian are probably the last relics of the idealistic era of the 1980s and 1990s.

| WAL in PostgreSQL: 3. Checkpoint

We already got acquainted with the structure of the buffer cache — one of the main objects of the shared memory — and concluded that to recover after failure when all the RAM contents get lost, the write-ahead log (WAL) must be maintained.

The problem yet unaddressed, where we left off last time, is that we are unaware of where to start playing back WAL records during the recovery. To begin from the beginning, as the King from Lewis Caroll's Alice advised, is not an option: it is impossible to keep all the WAL records from the server start — this is potentially both a huge memory size and equally huge duration of the recovery. We need such a point that is gradually moving forward and that we can start the recovery at (and safely remove all the previous WAL records, accordingly). And this is the checkpoint, to be discussed below.

| WAL in PostgreSQL: 2. Write-Ahead Log

Last time we got acquainted with the structure of an important component of the shared memory — the buffer cache. A risk of losing information from RAM is the main reason why we need techniques to recover data after failure. Now we will discuss these techniques.

| WAL in PostgreSQL: 1. Buffer Cache

The previous series addressed isolation and multiversion concurrency control, and now we start a new series: on write-ahead logging. To remind you, the material is based on training courses on administration that Pavel Luzanov and I are creating (mostly in Russian, although one course is available in English), but does not repeat them verbatim and is intended for careful reading and self-experimenting.

This series will consist of four parts:

  • Buffer cache (this article).
  • Write-ahead log — how it is structured and used to recover the data.
  • Checkpoint and background writer — why we need them and how we set them up.
  • WAL setup and tuning — levels and problems solved, reliability, and performance.